Carving the Future

Carving the Future

The Carving the Future program started as a chance to provide skiers with physical disabilities the opportunity to try ski racing for the first time and have a chance to work directly with National Team Coaches. The program now provides support to programs at all levels along with the Para-Alpine Long Term Athlete Development plan.

Full Video

The Carving the Future program is a multidimensional approach to athlete development and focuses on three main pillars:

  1. Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion: Carving the Future provides opportunities for Canadians with a disability to try ski racing with a national team coach and helps the facilitation of athlete development at all levels. It aims to break down barriers of participation for all levels of sport, from grassroots to High Performance.

  2. Alignment of the Para-Alpine system: Carving the Future aims to bring together ski hills, ski clubs and adaptive ski programs from Coast to Coast to Coast with Alpine Canada, to introduce racing to athletes, coaches, volunteers, and families.

  3. Athlete Identification: Carving the Future works closely with Para-Alpine stakeholders across Canada to identify potential next-generation Paralympic Winter Games Athletes, and to provide support to those athletes in their development 

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These camps are offered in conjunction with a local ski hills, ski clubs, and adaptive organization. By partnering with these organizations, we can give participants at all levels a chance to interact and ski with national team athletes and coaches. For independent skiers, there is also an opportunity to be coached directly by members of the Canadian Para-Alpine Ski Team coaching staff, and next to national team athletes.

Coaching the future is an education program targeted directly at clubs, programs, and individual coaches who have an interest in para-alpine skiing. These opportunities include programming support for individuals, resources, and technical expertise for programs and instructors. As well as the development of a Coach-Integration project in which selected coaches will be given the opportunity to work directly with the National Prospect and Nextgen teams in a camp-based environment.

Canadian Adaptive Snowsports supports and encourages over 2,100 participants living with disabilities to be active for life and to work towards long-term development. CADS also supports over 1,600 certified instructors and over 1,500 volunteers to fully participate and to develop their skills to achieve their personal peakt. In 2016 Alpine Canada Signed an Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with CADS to make them theofficial provider of development programs for the Canadian Para-Alpine Ski Team.

By working directly with CADS we are able to provide resources and expertise to the entire CADS network for little to no cost. We also offer a five day Learn to Race program that is coached by national team and provincial team coaches at the year-end CADS festival each season, and provide multiple coach education opportunities at different clubs across the country.

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Safe Sport

Safe Sport

Alpine Canada is committed to being a national and international leader in advancing inclusive, healthy, rights-based, safe sport for all individuals. Specifically, we strive to be an equitable and inclusive community, rich with diversity, protecting the human rights of all persons and based upon understanding and mutual respect for the dignity and worth of every person.

Photo Caption Malcolm Carmichael

A safe sport environment is one in which all sport Participants recognize, and report acts of maltreatment and prioritize the welfare, safety, and rights of every person at all times. 



  • OUR COMMITMENT

    We will cultivate, uphold, live, and measure these Safe Sport principles through:

    1. Establishment, oversight, and continuous updating of policies, procedures, and best practice guidelines that are robust, clear, and accessible.
    2. Consistent enforcement of the ensuing policies, procedures, and best practice guidelines through all levels of the ACA community in Canada.
    3. Implementation of best practice safeguards, support for prompt identification and reporting of misconduct, as well as confidential, procedurally fair, and timely processes for investigating and resolving allegations of misconduct. 
    4. Provision of educational resources, tools, and initiatives that serve to develop, support, and enhance the knowledge and positive practices of all members of the ACA community.
    5. Active promotion of our Safe Sport commitment throughout all ACA programs, interactions, activities, and events.
    6. Consistent engagement and open communication in both official languages with all members of the ACA community.
    7. Collaboration with international federations, national sport and multi-sport organizations, as well as public partners to support and advance Safe Sport programs.
    8. Evaluation of the effectiveness of ACA’s Safe Sport Framework and corresponding policies, education, and advocacy initiatives periodically.
  • REPORTING MALTREATMENT

    If a minor is in immediate danger or risk call 911 or the Canadian Centre for Child Protection at 1-800-532-9135. 

    Known or suspected maltreatment of a minor must also be reported to ACA’s Independent Third Party. This provides ACA an opportunity to further investigate the allegation and remove the alleged perpetrator from the organization if necessary. 

    Reporting to the Independent Third-Party: 

    In relation to adults, a crime or suspected crime should be reported directly to the police and the corresponding sport organization’s Independent Third-Party.  

    If you report a valid suspicion and it turns out to be unfounded, there are no penalties for you. Provincial and territorial child protection legislation ensures individuals who report suspicions of maltreatment in compliance with the duty to report provision will not be penalized if the report is later deemed unsubstantial. For more information, please review:

    Jurisdictional Legislation on Child Protection:
    Provincial and Territorial Child Protection Legislation and Policy (2018)

  • RESPONDING TO A COMPLAINT

    Independent Third-Party Contact: 

    As part of Alpine Canada’s commitment to safety in sport and in accordance with Sport Canada requirements, Alpine Canada has selected Ilan Yampolsky as its Independent Third-Party Contact.  Ilan is the designated individual to receive and review all complaints, allegations, and concerns of possible breaches to Alpine Canada’s code of conduct policies. 

    Managing Complaints 

    The following documents illustrate the complaint management pathways that may be pursued by ACA’s ITP.

    Complaint Management Pathways

    Click on the chart or above title for PDF version.


    Managing Major Infractions

    Click on the chart or above title for PDF version.


    Managing Minor Infractions

    Click on the chart or above title for PDF version.

  • POLICIES

    Affiliation with ACA brings many privileges and benefits. As such, ACA Participants are expected to conduct themselves in all matters involving or impacting the ACA, and where they may be seen to be representing the ACA, in a manner that is fully consistent with the highest standards of behaviour upon which the ACA’s reputation rests. At all times, ACA Participants’ behaviour must reflect and not compromise the trust of the ACA’s stakeholders and Canadians.

    Code of Conduct Policy (suite of policies)

    Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Policy

    Social Media Policy

  • APPEALS

    Participants disciplined for Major Infractions are permitted to submit an Appeal using the Alpine Canada Alpin Appeal Form. For information, please refer to ACA’s Appeals Policy. 

    For more information, please access ACA’s Appeal Policy

    Alpine Canada Alpin Appeal Form (PDF)

  • SUPPORT SERVICES

    Alpine Canada is committed to ensuring that all Participants can enjoy the sport in a safe and inclusive environment that is free of maltreatment. Our goal is to support and enhance the physical, psychological, emotional, and social well-being of all individuals in the skiing community. If you require any assistance or support, please refer to the following support resources for more information.

    Alpine Canada Alpin 
    Safe Sport Manager, Alpine Canada Alpin Joseph Gurgis – jgurgis@alpinecanada.org 

    Sport Canada 
    Canadian Sport Helpline: 1-888-83SPORT (1-888-837-7678) or info@abuse-free-sport.ca 

    Crisis Services Canada
    Canada Suicide Prevention Service: 1-833-456-4566 (24/7) or text 45645 (4 pm to 12 am ET)
    Kids Help Phone: 1-800-668-6868 (toll-free) or text CONNECT to 686868 for Participants up to age 20 years          
    Hope for Wellness Help Line: 1-855-242-3310 (toll-free) or connect online at Hope for Wellness Chat
    Trans Lifeline: 1-877-330-6366 (all ages)

    Alberta Crisis Line: 403-266-4357 (all ages)
    British Columbia Crisis Line: 1-800-SUICIDE (all ages)
    Manitoba Crisis Line: 1-877-435-7170 (all ages)
    New Brunswick Crisis Line: 1-800-667-5005 (all ages)
    Newfoundland and Labrador Crisis Line: 1-888-737-4668 (all ages)
    Nova Scotia Crisis Line: 1-888-429-8167 (all ages)
    Ontario Crisis Line: 1-866-531-2600 (all ages)
    Prince Edward Island Crisis Line: 1-800-218-2885 (all ages)
    Quebec National Crisis Line: 1-866-277-3553 (all ages)
    Saskatchewan Crisis Line: 1-306-525-5333 (all ages)
    Yukon Crisis Line: 1-844-533-3030 (all ages), 7 pm-12 am (PST)

  • CANADIAN SAFE SPORT RESOURCES

    Canadian Sport promises to contribute to the physical, psychological, social, and spiritual health of individuals of varying abilities, backgrounds, and interests and contributes to societal engagement and pride. Only when sport environments are safe and inclusive can these values be realized. Individuals should have the reasonable expectation when they participate in sport in Canada that it will be in an environment that is accessible, inclusive, respects their personal goals, and is free from all forms of Maltreatment. 

    Please refer to the resources below to learn more about Canada’s efforts towards advancing safe sport. 

    Concussion Management and Prevention 

    Despite recent increased attention focusing on concussions, there is a continued need to improve concussion education and awareness. Optimizing the prevention and management of concussion depends highly on annual education of all sport stakeholders (athletes, parents, coaches, officials, teachers, trainers, and licensed healthcare professionals) on evidence-informed approaches that can prevent concussion and more serious forms of head injury and help identify and manage an athlete with a suspected concussion

  • EDUCATION

    Education is an essential component to shift the culture of sport towards one that is safe, accessible, inclusive, and free from maltreatment. Several sport and health organizations across Canada have prepared courses to enhance our knowledge of how to safeguard everyone in sport. 

    Maltreatment Awareness and Prevention 

    Concussion Awareness and Prevention 

    Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion 

    For Parents

  • HUMAN RIGHTS IN SPORT

    Sport is one of the best ambassadors to promote human rights and the inclusion of all. Through sport, people learn values that cross-gender, physical ability, creed, sexuality, nationality, age, and economic status. Every individual has the right to participate in accessible, inclusive, and safe sport. It is, therefore, the collective responsibility of every individual affiliated with ACA to ensure these rights are upheld and respected at all times. The governance and delivery of safe sport should at all times be based on national and international human rights instruments, principles, and standards. As such, the ACA acknowledges and respects the following for each Participant affiliated with the organization:  

    1. Everyone has the right to feel safe and participate in an accessible and inclusive sport or work environment without being subject to maltreatment on the basis of age, ancestry, colour, race, citizenship, ethnic origin, place of origin, language, creed, religion, athletic potential, ability, family status, marital status, gender identity, gender expression, sex, and sexual orientation. 
    2. Everyone has the right to fair and equal gender representation. 
    3. Everyone has the right to the protection of mental and physical health, including a safe competition, work, and training environments, and protection from maltreatment. 
    4. Everyone has the right to be part of a transparent, fair, and clean sporting environment, particularly one that fights against doping and competition manipulation, and provides for transparent judging/refereeing, selection and qualification processes, and appropriate competition schedules, including training schedules at such competitions. 
    5. Everyone has the right to access general information that will enhance one’s ability to make informed decisions in a timely and clear manner. 
    6. Everyone has the right to access education on sports-related matters. 
    7. Everyone has the right to report unethical behaviour without fear of retaliation. 
    8. Everyone has the right to privacy, including the protection of personal information. 
    9. Everyone has the right to freedom of expression. 
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ALPINE CANADA CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19) INFORMATION

ALPINE CANADA CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19) INFORMATION

Updated July 20, 2020

As athletes, clubs, PTSOs and Alpine Canada begin to reintroduce training into our schedules the health and safety of our community is paramount.

The COVID-19 outbreak has required the integration of additional measures, and continual assessment to avoid transmission the virus in the training and competitive environments within Canada and abroad. Alpine Canada recognizes the importance of maintaining the safety and health of everyone involved in alpine, para-alpine and ski cross training and competition including the athletes, coaches, staff, IST, and contractors.  

Alpine Canada has created this document to support the development of return to sport planning for alpine, para-alpine and ski cross training and racing. This document can serve as a guide to setting up a return to sport plan utilizing the R-SAT risk assessment and mitigation checklist tool.  Using these tools, sport organizations can assess the risk in their return to sport plans and protocols in specific sport participation environments. 

Read the COVID-19 Return to Skiing Internal Risk Mitigation Resource Document here.

Read the ACA Return to Training Sport Specific Operations V1 here.

Helpful resources:

Government of Canada Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): Outbreak update

Joint message from Chief Medical Officers from the COC, CPC, and COPSIN

FIS Update: Status of FIS events in light of the Novel Coronavirus

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Alpine Canada Benefits

Alpine Canada provides leadership and support to athlete, coach and official registered participants.  While there was less racing than usual this year, the effort, investment, and partnership to support the ski racing community was needed more than ever.  Leadership of Return to Sport/Competition protocols, transition of coach & official we education to online platforms, implementation of a national alpine points platform, Safe Sport Framework and insurance program in a COVID world have helped us weather the storm and lay the groundwork for a strong future for ski racing in Canada. 

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Ways to Give

Ways to Give

BE PART OF THE TEAM BY SUPPORTING OUR ATHLETES! 

To reach the podium, our athletes need rigorous dryland training, access to ski camps around the globe, superior year-round coaching, travel to national and international competitions, proper nutrition, essential mental performance support, and state of the art equipment. Donors play a significant role in ensuring our athletes have all the resources they need to reach their full potential and make Canada proud on the global ski racing scene. Below is a list of ways that you can make a difference in the journey of our ski racing champions.

Alpine Canada is a registered charity. Our charitable registration number is: 10016 4995 RR 0001.


CONTRIBUTE TO OUR ANNUAL FUNDRAISING CAMPAIGN

 On average, it costs approximately $200,000 per year to support an athlete with competitive  ski racing programming. To make this possible, Alpine Canada relies on government partners, sponsors and generous donors who come together to empower our athletes to focus on one thing: skiing fast! Donations of any size can have a significant impact on the training and development of our athletes. By joining Alpine Canada as a donor, you can take part in their Olympic and Paralympic journey and have a stake in Canadian ski racing excellence. Support Alpine Canada and the next generation of champions with your donation today! Your support will have an immediate impact on Canadian athletes. Choose a one-time gift, or a monthly contribution. Online donations can be made here.


PODIUM CLUB MEMBERSHIP

 Alpine Canada’s Podium Club appeals to individuals and corporations wishing to join an exclusive group of like-minded donors who are intent on moving the needle in ski racing excellence in Canada. By making a minimum contribution of $5,500 annually, Podium Club members have a direct impact on team operation funding and allow our athletes to be competitive on the world stage. As an added perk, Podium Club donors also have access to exclusive club and team apparel. Established in the late 1990’s and the clubs has injected millions into the successes of dozens of Canadian Olympian and Paralympians! For more information about the Podium Club, click here.


PERSONAL GIVING

 Alpine Canada invites donors to make a significant and lasting impact on ski racing in Canada by making a sizable investment in our sport. You can choose to help by making a gift or creating an award. Alpine Canada is pleased to help you select a program or multiple programs that best fit with your interests in ski racing. By creating an award, you can provide immediate support to a talented athlete or coach. For more information on these initiatives, please contact info@alpinecanada.org


GIFTS FROM THE USA

 Alpine Canada welcomes gifts from friends south of the border wishing to celebrate and show their support for Canadian ski racing excellence. Thanks to our collaboration with the Canadian Olympic Foundation, we have partnered with Charities Aid Foundation of America to enable U.S residents to make an impact on Alpine Canada and our athletes, and receive a U.S tax receipt. Your donation will be automatically transferred to Alpine Canada. Simply specify your wish to have your donation directed to Alpine Canada on the donation form. Online donations can be made here.


GIFTS OF SECURITIES

 When you donate publicly listed securities, you are making an immediate impact towards the advancement of our athletes’ road to achieving their dreams, while not having to pay capital gains taxes. You will also receive a tax receipt for the closing price recorded on the day the securities are received into our account, or at sale value if securities are disposed of on the day of the receipt. For further information or to notify us of a transfer, please use this form.


EXPERIENTIAL AND EVENT GIVING

 You can raise money by planning and implementing a successful community event in support of Alpine Canada and Canada’s next generation of high performance ski racers. Examples include hosting a fundraiser, a silent auction or a unique workplace event. Learn more by contacting info@alpinecanada.org.


SKI WITH AN ALUMNI 

 What if you could enjoy a once in a lifetime skiing experience with a ski team alumni all the while helping to support the current generation of champions? You and up to three  guests can enjoy a half day or full day of skiing with an inspirational athlete and learn more about their incredible journey. Fully customizable, the day can include skiing tips, a guided mountain tour and even ski team apparel! Create memories to last a lifetime all the while helping our athletes chase the top of the podium! Learn more by contacting info@alpinecanada.org.


ENDOWMENT

 By creating an endowed gift, a donor can help create a sustained source of funding for Alpine Canada. Funds in the Endowment are held in perpetuity; the income derived from these investments provides a long-term and predictable source of support. An endowed gift is an investment in the future of ski racing in Canada and a guaranteed way to support our talented athletes, coaches, and sport over the long-term. We invite you to be a part of our future with an investment in the Endowment or with the establishment of a named fund. To make an Endowment gift to Alpine Canada or for more information, please contact info@alpinecanada.org


LEGACY

 Planning a legacy gift in the form of a bequest in your will or in the form of a donated life insurance to Alpine Canada is an amazing way to demonstrate your love for our sport and your investment in high performance ski racers in Canada. A legacy gift allows you the satisfaction and joy of knowing that you are contributing to the ongoing success of Alpine Canada without affecting your income during your lifetime. In addition, gifts made to charitable organizations will offer significant tax benefits and a bequest to Alpine Canada will reduce the amount of taxes owed by your estate.


AEROPLAN MILES PROGRAM

 Each year, Alpine Canada invests more than $1 million in travel expenses for our  athletes and coaches to get to locations around the world for training camps and races. To offset the substantial cost of chasing snow, you can make a gift in the form of Aeroplan Miles. Thanks to your valuable in-kind gift, we will be able to redeem miles for our teams to travel to remote locations! Help our athletes take flight to their next podium result and give miles today by clicking here.


AUCTION PROGRAM

 Each year, Alpine Canada hosts various auctions to raise additional funds in support of our athletes’  dreams. In-kind gifts in the form of items and experiences to Alpine Canada can make highly coveted  items for our auctions! A hotel stay, a gift certificate for a restaurant, a vintage pair of skis, a pair of tickets for a hockey game, and a trip to an amazing ski location, are just a few examples of prizes that appeal to our vibrant community of bidders! All funds generated from our auctions are injected back into our athletes and Canadian ski racing system. To contribute a gift, contact info@alpinecanada.org


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Policies

Policies

Photo Caption Malcolm Carmichael

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Corporate Donors

Corporate Donors

As a corporation, you too can join our Olympic and Paralympic Journey.

On behalf of Alpine Canada’s world-class athletes, thank you for your generosity and support of Canadian ski racing, helping Canada’s Olympic and Paralympic hopefuls reach achieve their dreams of representing Canada on the world stage.

Alpine Canada will work in collaboration with all Corporate Donors on a customized benefit package in appreciation for your support.

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Terms of Use

The information on this site may be used for educational and other non-commercial purposes, provided any reproduction of data is accompanied by an acknowledgement of Alpine Canada as the source (Alpine Canada, www.alpinecanada.org).

Under no circumstance may an outside party copy, extract pictures, videos, logos or visual images from alpinecanada.org. Picture, video, logo and visual image requests may be e-mailed to info@alpinecanada.org.

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Privacy Policy & Security

Alpine Canada Alpin reserves the right to change this Privacy Policy at any time by posting the revised Privacy Policy on alpinecanada.org.

WHAT IS PERSONAL INFORMATION?

Personal Information is information that refers to an individual specifically and is recorded in any form. Personal information includes such things as age, income, birth date, medical records, credit records.

COLLECTION OF PERSONAL INFORMATION

Alpine Canada does not automatically collect personal information such as your name, address, telephone number or email address when you visit this site. Such information will be collected by Alpine Canada if you provide it to us in order to:

-receive our newsletter
-enter a contest or promotion
-request information from us.

We do not require that any personal information be provided in order to view our website.

Alpine Canada collects only the personal information required to provide products and services to you.

If the personal information we require is collected for a reason other than to provide products and services, your consent will be requested at or before the time the information is collected. Examples of reasons we collect personal information include:

-to respond to your inquiries and send you requested information
-to provide products and services you request
-to allow you to participate in contests and promotions
-to protect against fraud and error
-to recommend products and services that Alpine Canada believes will be of interest to you
-to comply with legal and government regulations

RETENTION OF PERSONAL INFORMATION

Alpine Canada does not sell or rent personal information to any organization or person for any reason. We do not share your personal information without your consent with any third party organizations except to offer you products or services we believe will be of interest to you.

Alpine Canada retains your personal information only as long as it is required for our business relationship or as required by federal or provincial laws.

You can change your consent preferences at any time or request access to the personal information we have on record in order to review and amend the information by contacting media@alpinecanada.org.

COOKIES

Like many organizations, Alpine Canada uses cookie technology on our site. A "cookie" is a unique identifier collected by the site to verify a returning visitor's identity, or to understand how visitors navigate the site. The use of cookies is standard on the Internet and many major websites use them (You can visit the Network Advertising Initiative if you want to find out more information about this practice). Most web browsers automatically accept cookies. You can usually change your browser to prevent or notify you whenever you are sent a cookie. This gives you the chance to decide whether or not to accept the cookie.

A cookie does not tell us who you are, your email address, or any other personal information. We use the information it provides to help us improve the site and our service, and to provide our visitors with a better website visit. We do not share information obtained through cookies with any third parties.

We have no control over the content of third party websites that individuals may access through hyperlinks at our website. We encourage everyone to read the privacy policy of every website they visit.

Even without accepting a cookie you can still access most of the features on the site. There may, however, be limitations on your use of some site functions.

LINKS TO OTHER WEBSITES

This site may contain links to websites of third parties. Alpine Canada is not responsible for the privacy practices or the content of such websites.

By using alpinecanada.org, you are consenting to the information collection and use described in this policy.

CONTACT

If you have any questions about our privacy policy, please contact media@alpinecanada.org.

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Make a Donation

Make a Donation

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Podium Club

Podium Club

Alpine Canada supports the development of current and future world champions, Olympians and Paralympians through the delivery of world-class programming across all three of our sport disciplines which include alpine skiing, para-alpine skiing, and ski cross. 

A great way to become part of the team is as a member of our flagship Podium Club program. The Podium Club is a long-term fundraising campaign aimed at building future ski champions. Our vision is to prepare the next generation of Olympians and Paralympians who will stand on the podium on the world stage. By becoming a Podium Club member you are supporting future Olympians and Paralympians, as well as athletes who are part of our elite development programs. You are also delivering essential resources to support our domestic programs aimed at ensuring our sport's sustainability and long term success.

The Podium Club has four levels of membership that each offer exclusive benefits.

$5,500 Annual Contribution - BRONZE MEDALLIST

Benefits include: (benefits across all levels)

  • Tax receipt for the total value of the deductible benefits received
  • One Podium Club Bronze apparel kit: Helly Hansen midlayer, Helly Hansen travel bag, Level Gloves 
  • Adopt an athlete - you will be paired with an athlete for regular correspondences
  • Exclusive offers and discounts to Alpine Canada’s online store 
  • Access to Alpine Canada partner offers as offered
  • Invitations to exclusive Alpine Canada events and functions
  • Podium Club e-newsletter updates throughout the year
Donate

$10,000 Annual Contribution - SILVER MEDALLIST

Benefits include:

  • Tax receipt for the total value of the deductible benefits received
  • One Podium Club Silver apparel kit: Canadian Alpine Ski Team replica ski jacket, Helly Hansen midlayer, Helly Hansen travel bag, Level Gloves (or this can be replaced by two Podium Club Bronze apparel kits)
  • Adopt an athlete - you will be paired with an athlete for regular communications
  • Exclusive offers and discounts to Alpine Canada’s online store
  • Access to Alpine Canada partner offers as offered
  • Invitations to exclusive Alpine Canada events and functions
  • Podium Club e-newsletter updates throughout the year
Donate

$25,000 Annual Contribution - GOLD MEDALIST

Benefits include:

  • Tax receipt for the total value of the deductible benefits received
  • Up to two Podium Club Silver apparel kits: 2 x Canadian Alpine Ski Team replica ski jacket, 2 x Helly Hansen midlayer, 2 x Helly Hansen travel bag, 2 x Level Gloves (or this can be replaced by five Podium Club Bronze apparel kits or mix and match for equivalent value)
  • Adopt an athlete - you will be paired with an athlete for regular communications
  • Exclusive offers and discounts to Alpine Canada’s online store 
  • Access to Alpine Canada partner offers as offered
  • Invitations to exclusive Alpine Canada events and functions
  • Podium Club e-newsletter updates throughout the year
Donate

$50,000 Annual Contribution - CRYSTAL GLOBE

Benefits include:

  • Tax receipt for the total value of the deductible benefits received
  • Up to five Podium Club Silver apparel kits: 5 x Canadian Alpine Ski Team replica ski jacket, 5 x Helly Hansen midlayer, 5 x Helly Hansen travel bag, 5 x Level Gloves (or this can be replaced by ten Podium Club Bronze apparel kits or mix and match for equivalent value)
  • Adopt an athlete - you will be paired with an athlete for regular communications
  • Exclusive offers and discounts to Alpine Canada’s online store 
  • Access to Alpine Canada partner offers as offered
  • Invitations to exclusive Alpine Canada events and functions
  • Podium Club e-newsletter updates throughout the year
Donate

Donor Impact Report 2019-2020

For more information about our Podium Club program, please contact:

Marie-Hélène Thibeault
Director, Philanthropy and Alumni Engagement
T 579.488.6670
mthibeault@alpinecanada.org 

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competitive

Competitive

Please note:

Categories apply to alpine, para-alpine and ski cross
Age is listed as of Dec. 31 this season
Members from Quebec are covered for Commercial General Liability under SQA's policy

Entry level (U10 and under)

Skier development stage (AIM 2 Win) - Competitors in the Gliding Start through Learn to Train stages.
Training – May train at any preapproved venue worldwide with a registered club program. ***With appropriate sport accident insurance compliance
Competition - May travel to compete in sanctioned events locally. Canada district provinces (East & West) can compete regionally. 
Required Insurance - Commercial General Liability  
Recommended insurance - Provincial health care, family or personal insurance policies for excess medical and sport accident. Out of Canada training/competition requires purchase of ACA provided Sport Accident Insurance (SAIP)
Registration form 

Recreational cards (U12-U21)

Skier development stage (AIM 2 Win) - Competitors in the Skier Essentials and Learn to Train stages.
Training – May train at any preapproved venue worldwide with a registered club program.***With appropriate sport accident insurance compliance
Competition - May travel to compete in events in any region within their province of registration. Does not allow for interprovincial competition. Ineligible for a FIS license, national team selection and national championship events.  
Required Insurance - Commercial General Liability 
Recommended insurance - Provincial health care, family or personal insurance policies for excess medical and sport accident. Out of Canada training/competition requires purchase of ACA provided Sport Accident Insurance (SAIP) 
Registration form  

National cards (U12-U21 and over)

Skier development stage (AIM 2 Win) - Competitors in Learn to Train stages and beyond.
Training – May train at any preapproved venue worldwide with a registered club program.***With appropriate sport accident insurance compliance
Competition - May compete outside of their province of registration. Eligible for a FIS license, national team selection* and national championships events. NOTE: Athletes must also hold a CAN FIS license for national team selection. Athletes are only required to hold 1 national card if they are a multi discipline athlete i.e. AL & SX

Required Insurance - Commercial General Liability  
Recommended insurance - Provincial health care, family or personal insurance policies for excess medical and sport accident.  Out of Canada training/competition requires purchase of ACA provided Sport Accident Insurance (SAIP)
Registration form  

FIS licenses (alpine and ski cross)

FIS licenses are issued separately for alpine and ski cross

Provincial FIS (U18 and over)

Skier development stage (AIM 2 Win) - Competitors in Learn to Race stages and beyond over the age of 16 years.
Competition - Eligible to race in FIS events within their home province only.***Mandatory to hold a national card to be able to register for a Provinical FIS license
Required Insurance - Commercial General Liability, provincial health care.
Recommended Insurance - Family or personal insurance policies for excess medical and sport accident. 
Registration form  
Athlete declaration form
Medical evaluation form  

Canadian FIS (U18 and over)

Skier development stage (AIM 2 Win) - Competitors in Learn to Race stages and beyond over the age of 16 years.
Competition - Eligible to race in FIS events within Canada.***Mandatory to hold a national card to be able to register for Canadian FIS license 
Required Insurance - Commercial General Liability, SAIP Class 3 and FIS Disability. 
Recommended Insurance - Provincial health care, family or personal insurance policies for excess medical and sport accident. 
Registration form
Athlete declaration form
Medical evaluation form  

FIS International (U18 and over)

Skier development stage (AIM 2 Win) - Competitors in Learn to Race stages and beyond over the age of 16 years.
Competition - Eligible to race in FIS events internationally. ***Point restrictions applicable for Southern hemisphere racing.***Mandatory to hold a national card to be able to register for a Canadian FIS license.  
Required Insurance - Commercial General Liability, SAIP Class 2 and FIS Disability. NOTE: SAIP Class 1insurance may need to be purchased if an athlete will be outside of Canada for more than 30 days. Contact your PSO for more information.
Recommended Insurance - Provincial health care, family or personal insurance policies for excess medical and sport accident. 
Registration form  
Athlete declaration form
Medical evaluation form 

Para-Alpine
IPC Canada license (U18 & Over)

Competition - Eligible to race in IPC sanctioned events within Canada.***Mandatory to hold a national card to be able to register for a Canadian IPC license 
Required Insurance - Commercial General Liability, SAIP Class 3
Recommended insurance - Provincial health care, family or personal insurance policies for excess medical and sport accident. 
Registration form

Athlete declaration form

Medical evaluation form  

IPC International license (U18 & Over)

Competition - Eligible to race in international IPC sanctioned events.***Mandatory to hold a national card to be able to register for a Canadian IPC license 
Required Insurance - Commercial General Liability, SAIP Class 2  
Recommended Insurance - Provincial health care, family or personal insurance policies for excess medical and sport accident. 
Registration form 

Athlete declaration form

Medical evaluation form

Masters

Masters' Weekend Pass (U21 and over)

For members over the age of 18 competing in Masters' events. Weekend cards can be purchased in any region however not out of province. Masters athletes wishing to race in another province MUST hold a masters national card.

Training – May train at any preapproved venue worldwide with a registered club program.
Competition - Valid for competition within home province only. 
Required Insurance - Commercial General Liability  
Recommended Insurance - Provincial Health Care, family or personal insurance policies for excess medical and sport accident. 
Registration form  

Masters' National Card (U21 and over)

For members over the age of 18 competing in Masters' events. National cards are purchased through your province of registration.

Training – May train at any preapproved venue worldwide with a registered club program.
Competition - May compete in sanctioned masters events nationally. Eligible to purchase a FIS license.
Required Insurance - Commercial General Liability  
Recommended Insurance - Provincial Health Care, family or personal insurance policies for excess medical and sport accident. 
Registration form  

Masters' FIS License

For members over the age of 30 years. Must hold a National card.

Competition - Eligible to race in FIS masters events internationally.***Mandatory to hold a national card to be able to register for a Canadian FIS Masters License.
Required Insurance - Commercial General Liability
Recommended Insurance - Provincial health care, family or personal insurance policies for excess medical and sport accident 
Registration form 

Athletes Declaration 

Medical evaluation form

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Committee

Committee members

Officials’ committee chair

John Lambert (Ontario) - jlambert_56@sympatico.ca or officials@alpinecanada.org 

Provincial Sport Organization Officials Chairs

British Columbia - Mark Schwenck - schwenck@telus.net

Alberta - Don Boyce - dlboyce@telusplanet.net

Ontario - Pete Dyson - dysonp@alpineontario.ca

Quebec - Yves Rolland - yrolland99@gmail.com

Canada District West* - Kent Code (Saskatchewan) - kent@outofbounds.org

*Canada district West includes; Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Yukon, Nunavut and the North West Territories.

Canada District East* - Henrik Tonning (New Brunswick) - henrik.tonning@gnb.ca

Canada district East includes; Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundlad and Labrador

FIS Alpine TC Commission for Canada

Sue Schwartz (AB) - cdnfooter@hotmail.com

Members-at-large

ACA para-alpine race program: TBC.

ACA ski cross race program: Lauren Kucera - lkucera@alpinecanada.org

Ski cross education advisor: Paul Plotz - paul.plotz@ontario.ca

Translations: Jean-Yves Gregoire - jean-yves.gregoire@videotron.ca

Other members may be appointed on a special needs or project basis as required.

Committee resources
Committee minutes: Oct. 2011

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PDFs and Forms

Alpine

FIS rules
National competition rule book
Alpine Canada certification of race officials 
Alpine entry form for non-FIS events 
Alpine Canada referee report posting form 
Alpine Canada start/finish time recording form 
Alpine Canada snowseed per cent table 
Alpine Canada protest form 
Alpine Canada technical delegate report form 
Race personnel assignment sheet 
Alpine Canada team captains’ meeting agenda 
Alpine Canada electronic time recording sheet 
Alpine Canada start/finish referee recording form 
Hand time of day worksheet 
Alpine Canada minutes of jury decision or protest 
Alpine Canada race incident report form 
National race quality report 
National TD technical report 
Distribution of documents for FIS events
Jury qualifications for jury members and others 
Racer down protocol 
Checklist for Continental Cup organizers 

Gate judge material
Gate judge card 
Printing your gate judge cards 
Gate judge information 
Guidelines for gate judges 
Guidelines for the chief of gates 
Gate maintenance - snow damage types and repair technique 
Gate volunteer checklist

Timing material
National timing report information 
National timing booklet 
National technical timing report
Hand-timing form
Draw Timer Results Interface System (dTris)

Barry B-net system
Barry B-net installation
Barry B-net pocket guide
Barry B-net system website

Alpina B-net system
Alpina B-net installation 
Alpina B-net system website

Liski B-net system
Liski B-net installation 
Liski B-net instructions

SPM B-net system
SPM B-net guidelines

Dye
Race course dye presentation 
Race course dye summary

Para-alpine

IPC rules and regulations
Para-alpine key features
Para-alpine start manual

Ski cross

Level One officials' manual
Level One event management presentation 
Level One safety presentation
Training day grid
Competition day grid
Ski cross event manual
FIS Freestyle international competition rules
FIS Freestyle points rules

Ski cross course guidelines
Ski cross gate judge card
Ski cross FIS event ladders
Ski cross open event ladders

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Criteria & Publications

Criteria & Publications

Photo Caption GEPA

Alpine Canada Strategic Plan

Alpine Canada Strategic Plan - 1 Pager

Documents and forms for Alpine Canada members

Alpine Criteria

Para-Alpine Critera

Ski Cross Criteria

Publications

2017-18 Year in Review

2016-17 Year in Review

2015-16 Year in Review

2014-15 Year in Review

Podium Club 2017-18

Financials 2013-14

Financials 2014-15

Financials 2015-16

Financials 2016-17

Financials 2017-18

Financials 2018 - 19

Financials 2019 - 20

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Masters

Masters

Who: Female and male ski racers aged 18 (as of December 31) to 85 and over.

What: The Alpine Canada Masters’ programme is a recreational programme that allows adult skiers to develop their technical skills and maintain a healthy lifestyle while competing with skiers from across the country and internationally.  Whether you are a former competitor or a new racer, the Masters’ programme is a fun way to enhance your skills on the slopes and be an example of the sport for life philosophy.

Get involved: Find a club near you to join a Masters programme and become an Alpine Canada member.  You can also contact your Masters’ regional representative for help.

Types of membership: Please note*** provincial fees vary by province.

Masters Weekend Pass:  Members over the age of 18 competing in Masters' events. Weekend cards can be purchased in any region however not out of province. Masters athletes wishing to race in another province MUST hold a masters national card. TRAINING - May train at any preapproved venue worldwide  with a registered club program. COMPETITION - Valid for competition within home province only. REQUIRED INSURANCE - Commerical general liability. RECOMMENDED INSURANCE - Provincial health care, family  or personal insurance policies for excess medical and sport accident.

Masters National card:  For members over the age of 18 competing in Masters' events. National cards are purchased through your province of registration. TRAINING - May train at any preapproved venue worldwide with a registered club program. COMPETITION - May compete in sanctioned masters events nationally. Eligible to purchase a FIS license. REQUIRED INSURANCE - Commercial general liability. RECOMMENDED INSURANCE - Provincial health care, family or personal insurance policies for excess medical and sport accident.

Masters FIS card: For members over the age of 30 years. must hold a National card. COMPETITION - Eligible to race in FIS masters events internationally. ***Mandatory to hold a national card to be able to register for a Canadian FIS masters license. REQUIRED INSURANCE - Commercial general liability. RECOMMENDED INSURANCE - Provincial health care, family or personal insurance policies for excess medical and sport accident.

FIS Masters’ equipment rules: Please note, FIS Masters’ ski length recommendations do not apply to the Canadian Masters’ events. Please visit the Alpine Canada Alpin National Competition Rules for further information in relation to National Masters equipment standards and the FIS site for FIS Masters equipment standards. 

International racers: All non-Canadian racers who wish to enter an Alpine Canada sanctioned race must have their entries submitted by their National Ski Organization (PSO) to Alpine Canada at minimum 2 weeks prior to the event. Entries are to be submitted to raceentries@alpinecanada.org. Incomplete or late entries will not be accepted.

FAQ about Masters' racing

Masters Resources: 
2018 Points List 2017 Points List 2016 points list2015 points list2014 points list2013 points list2012 points list2011 points list2010 points list 
2016-2017 Canadian Masters Team
Team selection criteria
Canadian Masters Hall of Fame
Awards
Contact info: National committee

National Masters Cup
Masters’ newsletter:  Subscribe,Masters on Facebook, Twitter (Cdn Alpine Masters) 

Master's Webpage: Alpine Canada Masters 

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Officials

Officials

Photo Caption GEPA

Alpine ski officials shall demonstrate high standards of judgment and competency as they represent Alpine Canada and their provincial alpine associations at all times. The hallmarks of good officials are promptness, firmness and justice, tempered by tact and consideration.

Officials must be impartial and must supervise and control an event in a manner that reflects the spirit and intent of the rules and regulations. They will provide a competition that will preserve the health and safety of all involved. They will do their utmost to guarantee that each competitor receives an equal and fair opportunity to win. They will promote sportsmanship and an atmosphere of enjoyment.

Officials must maintain high standards of moral and ethical conduct that includes self-controlled responsible behavior, consideration for others’ physical and emotional well-being, courtesy and good manners.

Officials must abstain from the use of illegal drugs and the consumption of alcohol while in the performance of their duties as a representative of Alpine Canada and their provincial alpine associations.

Officials must refrain from the use of profane, insulting, harassing or otherwise offensive language in the conduct of his/her duties.

Officials should both teach and learn with every assignment. Officials should exhibit and promote respect, understanding and compassion towards hosts, competitors, coaches and volunteers no matter where they are on the learning curve.

Officials must not engage in "on" or "off" the record criticism of race organizations, competitors, coaches and volunteers to the public or to other alpine skiing organizations. In giving event feedback to race organization, competitors, coaches and volunteers, officials shall make suggestions that are constructive, founded and relevant to the improvement of ski racing.

Disciplinary action against officials
If an official appears to have exhibited behavior or conduct that is contrary to the code of conduct and the parties concerned cannot resolve the matter informally, the following procedure shall be followed for all nationally-sanctioned events. Any complaints arising from a FIS-sanctioned event will be dealt with through the procedures established by the International Ski Association (FIS).

A complaint in writing describing the issue shall be submitted to the appropriate officials’ chair of the appropriate governing body:

LEVEL AUTHORITY
FIS FIS TD Commissioner for Canada
National championships Alpine Canada Officials' chair
Provincial championships PSO officials' chair
PSO and divisional events

PSO officials' chair

Local event Regional or zone officials’ chair


Lodging a complaint:

The appropriate officials’ chair shall review the submission and if they feel the matter warrants it, they shall establish a committee of three persons to consider whether action should be taken against the official. The chair may or may not be a member of the committee. The members of the committee should be drawn from persons experienced with ski racing. 

Should the officials’ chair, after reviewing the submission, feel that further action is not warranted, they shall communicate their decision in writing to the parties concerned explaining why. A copy of this decision will also be sent to the board (or an appropriate official) of the governing body.

Review by a committee:

A duly-constituted committee will determine the manner in which it will pursue an investigation of all relevant details concerning the complaint. The committee may invite further submissions from the parties, written or other; it may invite the parties to appear before it and provide oral evidence; it may seek information from anyone in addition to the parties who it feels may shed light on the matter; it may pursue any other avenue that in the committee’s opinion, would enable them to reach an informed decision. In all matters, the official shall be fully informed of the nature of the complaint and the evidence discovered through the investigation and be given an opportunity to respond in whatever manner the committee deems appropriate.  

After considering all relevant information, the committee will decide whether or not the complaint is justified and communicate that in writing to the parties with reasons for the decision. A copy of this decision will also be sent to the board (or an appropriate official) of the governing body.

Should the committee determine that actions of the official have violated the code of conduct, the committee may impose whatever consequences they feel appropriate including but not limited to: a sanction, direction for remedial training, reprimand, probation, revocation of participation privileges and/or loss of credentials.

Appeal of a decision:

The decision taken by the appropriate officials’ chair as to whether a complaint should proceed or of a review committee as to whether a breach of code has occurred, may be appealed by either party as outlined below:

The process for considering an appeal shall follow that of a complaint other than decisions by the national officials’ chair/review committee.

Where a decision of the national officials’ chair or a review committee brought together by the national officials’ chair is subject to an appeal, that appeal will be considered by the entire national officials’ committee excluding the chair and any members who were involved with the review committee, as the case may be. Decisions of the national officials’ committee are final and not subject to further review.

Competitors have the right to expect that officials have a high level of expertise so that results reflect the athletes' ability and skills without being compromised by the incompetence of race officials or "luck." As such, the National Alpine Officials’ Committee is in place to help Alpine Canada establish standards and develop tools that will allow provincial alpine associations to deliver their officials program efficiently and in a professional manner.

Categories requiring officials' certification

Administration Course Timing Jury
Race chairman Chief of race Chief of timing and calculations Technical delegate
Chief of administration (race secretary)

Chief of course

Chief of timing

TD candidate
Race office Chief of gate judges

Starter

Referee
Event quality Gate judge Assistant starter Assisstant referee
Chief of event quality

Course crew

Timer Start referee
Chief of ski area relations

Chief of equipment

Timer recorder Finish referee
Chief of media and awards

Chief steward

Chief of calculation  
  Steward Calculator  
    Finish controller  

Alpine Canada officials’ certification criteria

Level 1

Level 1 manual | Level 1 presentation

This is the entry-level course. It is an overall introduction to race organization and the various officials’ positions with particular emphasis on timekeeping and gate judging. There are no course prerequisites or required experience. Participants will benefit more if they have practical experience.

Course attendance automatically qualifies the participant as Level 1 Alpine Official. Parents of entry level and K1-level racers find this course an excellent introduction to race officiating and in gaining insight into the racing program as a whole.

Course description:
Time required: Three hours.
Course fee: Set by the provincial alpine associations’ officials’ chair – includes manual and officials’ pin
Prerequisites: None
Exam: None

Level 2

Level 2 manual | Level 2 presentation

This level is the second of three officials’ courses and is designed for those who have already taken the Level 1 course and have then obtained the necessary practical experience to qualify for Level 2.

Level 2 has been designed as a detailed introduction to the methodology of alpine ski racing, the types of races, rules, points systems as well as preparing officials for the managerial positions of chief of gates judges, chief of course, chief of race, start referee, finish referee and referee (coaches). It is a fairly intensive course and does not cover in any detail the material presented in Level 1.

The objectives of the course are to develop officials capable of functioning at a carded-level race and to provide a base of experience and knowledge to course participants to allow them to assume greater responsibilities at higher-level races.

Course description:
Time required: Eight hours plus a one-hour exam (may be done in one day or two evenings).
Course fee: Set by the provincial alpine associations’ officials’ chair – includes manual and officials’ pin.
Prerequisites: Level 1 certification and practical experience in at least three different 
officials’ positions from two different categories which cover a minimum of eight days race experience.
Exam: One hour – multiple choice, true/false and short answers. Open book.

Level 3

Level 3 manual (updated) | Level 3 presentation

This level further prepares officials for all chief positions and for minimum-entry qualifications for the Technical Delegate (TD) Program. It is designed for those officials who have obtained Level 2 and since then have gained specific practical experience as covered in the Alpine Officials’ Certification Program. It is an interactive course in which the major emphasis will be discussion and exchange of ideas, opinions and race experiences by the participants. An examination of the course outline will show the variety and depth of the material covered.

The level requires the official to gain all necessary knowledge (experience not included) to manage races at the national or FIS level. The course directs the participant to use the FIS ICR Book and apply the rules and their interpretation in precise circumstances. This level develops the volunteer’s judgment and leadership skills in concrete situations.

Course description: 
Time required: 12 hours. Generally given on a weekend but can be given over four evenings.
Course fee: Set by the provincial alpine associations’ officials’ chair – includes manual, course materials and officials’ pin.
Prerequisites: This course is only open to those who have the necessary prerequisites or are identified as being very close to having the necessary practical experience to take the course. Participants must be recommended by their provincial alpine associations’ officials’ chair.
Exam: Two-hour open book exam.

Level 4

This level is for those officials who have gained further experience at national or international level races and who have demonstrated superior knowledge and ability as an official. The provincial alpine associations’ officials’ chair must recommend the Level 4 nominee to the national Officials’ Committee.

Admission for coaches into the officials’ program
All Canadian Ski Coaches’ Federation (CSCF) Level 1 and higher can attend the Level 2 officials’ course without any other criteria of eligibility.
Prerequisite for referee – Level 2 CSCF and Level 2 official certification.
All Level 3 or 4 CSCF coaches can attend a Level 3 officials’ course without criteria of eligibility.

Officials’ recognition and identification
All officials will receive a national pin in recognition of their certification level.

Officials’ requirements to maintain certification
Upon qualification, the initial period of certification and practical requirements to maintain certification for each officials’ level is as follows:
Level 1    Three years    Activity as an official
Level 2    Three years    Work a minimum four race days in a three-year period and an officials’ update every two years.
Level 3    Two years       Work a minimum of  four- race days a year and an officials’ update every two years.
Level 4    Two years       Work four days a year as a TD or chief level or to the satisfaction of the officials’ chair. Attend an officials’ update every two years.


Technical delegate program

A technical delegate (TD) is a person who has advisory control over pre-race and race operation and together with other members of the jury has complete control over the competitive operation of a race. He or she along with the jury have the final decision in all matters of racer protection and have the authority to cancel, postpone or annul the race if necessary. In all cases, the TD is the representative of the governing body by whom he/she is appointed.

Technical delegate levels and criteria
A TD must have a broad working knowledge and experience as an official and have demonstrated an ability to handle a variety of on-hill situations in a calm and knowledgeable manner. The requirements for certification at the various levels are:

  1. Regional technical delegate (only Ontario) 
    • Level 2 officials’ certification. 
    • Recommended by the divisional and provincial alpine association’s officials’ chair. 
  2. PSO technical delegate – Technical (T)
    • Level 3 officials’ certification. 
    • Recommended by the provincial alpine association’s officials’ chair for TD certification. 
  3. PSO technical delegate – Technical/speed (T/S)
    • Level 3 officials’ certification. 
    • Certified in technical, downhill and super-G events. 
  4. National technical delegate
    • Level 4 officials’ certification. 
    • Licensed divisional TD (T) and/or (T/S). 
    • Recommended by the provincial alpine association’s officials’ chair to the Alpine Canada Officials’ Committee. 
  5. FIS technical delegate
    • The first step in entering the FIS TD program is nomination by two members of the national ski association, one of those members must be a licensed FIS technical delegate. The nomination must be signed by the PSO officials’ chair and PSO president prior to being sent to the Alpine Canada Officials’ Committee. The Alpine Canada Officials’ Committee TD sub-committee makes recommendations if the nominee should enter the FIS-candidate program and is accepted by the FIS commissioner for Canada.
    • If accepted, the candidate follows the program outlined in ICR 602.

*The minimum criteria to be assigned as a PSO/national technical delegate are the following:

  • Regional technical race: Level 2 
  • PSO technical race and speed event: Level 3 
  • National race events: Level 4. 

Race organization

The organizing committee of the sponsoring club or association is responsible for the overall conduct of an event.

The officials that are needed for an event will depend on the particular needs of the event and the availability of people. Nearly all of the activities needed to stage a FIS race take place at lower-level races. The various procedures will differ as will the number and qualifications of the various officials involved. For example, at a high-level race there will be a chief of awards and presentations to research and obtain prizes and to arrange a special awards ceremony. At a lower- level race, the race chairperson or the chief of administration (race secretary) will obtain the prizes and will quite often award them at the award ceremony. Further examples: the area ski patrol handles first aid and often security rather than a special team assembled just to cover that particular race; the chief of course will probably also act as chief of equipment and do course maintenance. In each case, the goal is accomplished and the rules were followed. 

Race organizing committee
The actual running of a race is done by the race organizing committee (ROC); the ROC’s chief or chairperson heads the committee. The race committee appoints the chief officials, assistants and crews.

Race jury
The jury is responsible for all decisions pertaining to the race, for the arbitration of protests and for upholding the rules. The jury members must collaborate closely with the race committee through the chief of race. Jury members include the technical delegate (chairman of the jury), chief of race, referee, assistant referee (for speed events) and two non-voting jury advisors - the start referee and finish referee. Jury members must be qualified with specific officials’ certifications for the level of race event.

Qualifications for jury members:

Downhill and super-G races

  • Chief of race:   
    • FIS - Level 3 - Official certification
    • PSO race - Level 2 certification
  • Assistant referee:    Coach with at least a Level 2 coach certification, plus Level 2 officials’ certification.
  • Referee:    Coach with at least a Level 2 coach certification and a Level 2 officials’ certification or a FIS or division licensed speed TD
  • Technical delegate:   
    • FIS - FIS technical delegate
    • PSO - Technical delegate - speed certification and minimum Level 3

Technical events

  • Technical delegate:   
    • FIS - FIS technical delegate
    • PSO - Minimum of Level 3 divisional technical delegate
    • Regional races - Level 2
  • Chief of race:   
    • FIS - Level 3 official
    • PSO - Level 2 official
  • Referee: Level 2 coach and Level 2 officials’ certification.
  • Assistant referee: Level 1 or 2 coach 

Introductory program 

  • All races, including weekly races must have one Level 2 official and three Level 1 officials in charge.

Note: the above are minimum qualifications for race jury positions.

Start and finish referees
In addition to the above, there are two jury advisors - start referee and finish referee. They are appointed by the race committee. They are responsible for the start and finish areas respectively. They advise the jury concerning competitor disqualifications and may with the approval of the jury allow provisional starts/re-runs.

Alpine Canada Alpin - Race Point Manipulation

Alpine officials are to use the FIS materials for all official documents. 

Forms can be found following the below link.

https://www.fis-ski.com/

National Competiton rules specific to Alpine Canada sanctioned national events can be found here.

Additional information for officials can be found below in our additional resoures.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES


Alpine Canada certification of race officials 
Alpine entry form for non-FIS events 
Race personnel assignment sheet 
Alpine Canada race incident report form 
Racer down protocol 
FIS Homologated Race Courses

Gate judge material
Gate judge card 
Printing your gate judge cards 
Gate judge information 
Guidelines for gate judges 
Guidelines for the chief of gates 
Gate maintenance - snow damage types and repair technique 
Gate volunteer checklist

Barry B-net system
Barry B-net installation
Barry B-net system website

Alpina B-net system
Alpina B-net installation 
Alpina B-net system website

Liski B-net system
Liski B-net installation 
Liski B-net instructions

SPM B-net system
SPM B-net guidelines

Dye
Race course dye presentation 
Race course dye summary

Para-alpine

IPC rules and regulations
Para-alpine key features
Para-alpine start manual

Ski cross

Level One officials' manual
Level One event management presentation 
Level One safety presentation
Training day grid
Competition day grid
Ski cross event manual
FIS Freestyle international competition rules
FIS Freestyle points rules

Ski cross course guidelines
Ski cross gate judge card
Ski cross FIS event ladders
Ski cross open event ladders

Committee members

Officials’ committee chair

John Lambert (Ontario) - jlambert_56@sympatico.ca or officials@alpinecanada.org 

Provincial Sport Organization Officials Chairs

British Columbia - Mark Schwenck - schwenck@telus.net

Alberta - Don Boyce - dlboyce@telusplanet.net

Ontario - Nathalene Hagar - officials@alpineontario.ca

Quebec - Claude Marquis - claude.marquis53@gmail.com

Canada District West* -  Teresa Grain (Saskatchewan) - teresagrain@hotmail.com

*Canada district West includes; Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Yukon, Nunavut and the North West Territories.

Canada District East* - Henrik Tonning (New Brunswick) - henrik.tonning@gnb.ca

Canada district East includes; Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundlad and Labrador

FIS Alpine TD Commission for Canada

Doug Campbell (ON) - 56fuller@gmail.com

FIS Ski Cross TD Commission for Canada

Jim Hemlin – jimhemlin@hotmail.com

Members-at-large

ACA para-alpine race program: TBC.

ACA ski cross race program: Jim Hemlin - jimhemlin@hotmail.com​

Ski cross education advisor: Paul Plotz - paul.plotz@ontario.ca

Translations: Jean-Yves Gregoire - jean-yves.gregoire@videotron.ca

Western Canada FIS TD Coordinator - Sue Schwartz (AB) - cdnfooter@hotmail.com  

Other members may be appointed on a special needs or project basis as required.

Committee resources

Other members may be appointed on a special needs or project basis as required

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Development

Development

Alpine Canada’s goal is to partner with our divisions in offering a progression of development opportunities and programs for young athletes at every stage of their development

Photo Caption Photo: Coast Mountain Photography

The following are a list of programs and projects offered by Alpine Canada and its divisions at various stages of the athlete-development pathway. These programs and projects were developed to support and complement the current network of clubs, regional teams and other alpine ski racing programs in Canada.

Snow Stars Skill Development Program

Snow Stars is a skill-development tool for young skiers operated by Alpine Canada since 2004.

This seven-step program will guide the child, coach and parent through a progression that is aligned with the Long Term Athlete Development Plan (AIM 2 WIN).

Optimal motor-skill development takes place primarily between aged five to 12. For this reason, the program is aimed generally at young skiers from Entry level to the end of U14. Snow Stars provides clubs and coaches guidance through the early "Windows of Trainability" when it is critical to carry out the "Right Athletic Development at the Right Time."

The goal of Snow Stars is to provide a solid foundation and knowledge base – physical, technical, tactical and mental – upon which to build children’s athletic abilities.

Snow Stars encourages the development of skiers and ski racers of all ability levels. It also encourages children to discover a pathway to the joy of skiing, competition and excellence in a fun and rewarding environment.

ltad.alpinecanada.org/athletes/snow-stars

Rising Star Camps

Aimed at the U16 and U18 age categories and the Learn to Race and Train to Race stages of the alpine ski racing LTAD, the goal of the Rising Star Training Camps is to bring athletes from all parts of Canada, and sometimes from other nations, together to create a high-level training environment and offer benchmarking opportunities.

Carving The Future - Para-Alpine Training Camps

Carving the future camps are held throughout Canada each year as an opportunity for athletes, parents, and coaches to experience para-alpine ski racing.

These camps are an excellent opportunity for athletes to learn more about Para-Alpine ski racing in Canada, as well as develop technical skills and working with Alpine Canada coaches and Staff.

For more information, please contact Mark Newton, Para-Alpine Sport & Development Manager: mnewton@alpinecanada.org.

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Members

Members

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Skiing in Canada

Who can become a member: Competitive and non-competitive skiers, coaches, officials, parents, volunteers and ski enthusiasts 
Which sports: Alpine, ski cross and para-alpine
Where: Across Canada 
How: Find a club near you on your provincial site below. 

National Membership: 
To become a member of Alpine Canada, please visit your Provincial or Territorial Sport Organisation’s website to find a locally sanctioned club.

For all competitive programs, annual national membership with Alpine Canada is mandatory. National membership dues are paid through your sanctioned club and you must be registered before the competition season begins.

For Alpine Canada national membership information for the upcoming season click here.  

Alberta – albertaalpine.ca 
B.C. – bcalpine.com 
Manitoba – skimanitoba.com 
New Brunswick – skinb.ca  
Newfoundland and Labrador – alpineskinl.ca 
Nova Scotia – alpineskinovascotia.ca 
Ontario – alpineontario.ca 
P.E.I. – email sports@sportpei.pe.ca for more information 
Quebec – skiquebec.qc.ca 
Saskatchewan – saskalpine.com 
Yukon – www.alpineyukon.com

International skiing

How to race internationally in alpine or ski cross: 

Once you are a member of Alpine Canada, you can purchase an International Ski Federation (FIS) licence to race internationally. FIS licences are only issued by the national ski organizations (e.g. Alpine Canada). Follow these five steps to get a FIS licence. 

Step one: Are you eligible?

Athletes who want to register for a FIS licence for alpine racing or ski cross must go through their provincial alpine organization and must:

  • Be a Canadian citizen
  • Be a fully-paid national card member of Alpine Canada in good standing
  • Be 16 years old before December 31 that year 

Step two: Complete the athlete declaration and medical form.

Complete the following FIS athlete declaration and medical form and submit them to your provincial alpine organization. 
FIS athlete declaration form
Alpine Canada medical form 

Step four: Fee payment.

Pay your FIS licensing fees to your provincial alpine organization (fees are remitted on your behalf to Alpine Canada by the province). 

Step five: Check your profile.

An athlete profile will be created on the FIS website and can be viewed in the FIS biography section one week after submitting the declaration and medical forms and payment. Be sure to check your profile online for accuracy and inform your provincial alpine organization if there are any errors on your profile. It is each athlete’s responsibility to make your provincial alpine organization aware of any issues with your profile.

Please note: Athletes may only carry one FIS licence. Athletes with dual citizenship must choose one national federation to represent them. For further details on FIS-license restrictions, please refer to the FIS International Competition Rules, section 203. 

If you are an Alpine Canada returning member, please visit our Members’ section for FIS licence renewal information.

Para-alpine athletes should contact their provincial alpine organization for information on International Paralympic Committee licensing.

Change of nation for FIS athletes:

If you are a FIS-carded athlete from another country but would like to compete as a member of Alpine Canada, you may change your nation prior to April 15th each year. Only athletes with dual citizenship or with a residence in Canada for a minimum of two years prior to the request may be granted a change of nation by FIS. Contact Alpine Canada’s Manager, Membership Services at a aavoledo@alpinecanada.org for more information.

2017-2018 Change of Nation Information


As an Alpine Canada member, each year you must renew your membership through your provincial alpine association.

Read about the categories of Alpine Canada membership

Steps for renewing your Alpine Canada membership: 

Step one: Update and sign the Alpine Canada membership registration form (check with your provincial alpine association to see if online registration is available in your area) and medical evaluation.

Membership registration form

Medical evaluation form  

Step two: Submit both forms to your provincial alpine association along with the membership fees for your province.  

For athletes with a FIS licence: If you are an athlete racing with an International Ski Federation (FIS) licence – which allows you to race internationally – it is important to renew you licence each year by June 15 to protect your point profile from the previous season. For information on how to obtain your first FIS license, visit our Become a Member page. 

Steps for FIS-licence renewal: 

Step one: Ensure you have completed your Alpine Canada membership registration form, update your Alpine Canada medical form and submit to your provincial alpine association by June 15.

Medical evaluation form 

Step two: Pay the yearly fee to your provincial alpine association by June 15. Check with your province for information on fees in your region. 

Your information and fees will be forwarded by your province to Alpine Canada who will then activate with FIS.

Step three: Check your FIS profile on the FIS website to ensure your card has been activated one week after all forms and fees have been submitted to your province or territory. Be sure to check your profile online for accuracy and inform your province if there are any errors. It is each athlete’s responsibility to make your provincial alpine association aware of any issues with your profile.

FIS-licence cancellation:

FIS-licence cancellations cost $55 and must come through your provincial alpine association to Alpine Canada. There are absolutely no refunds after October 15.  

Alpine Canada offers insurance coverage to its members for the following areas through the Canadian Snowsports Association and the International Ski Federation (FIS).

Commercial general liability
Directors' and officers' liability
Sport accident insurance policy
FIS invalidity coverage

Level and scope of coverage varies by activity type and membership category.

How do I access these types of coverage?

To activate or renew coverage for a member: 

Step one: Register for membership with your local club - fill in the Alpine Canada membership form and waiver and then file with your club. Read about how to become an Alpine Canada member
Step two: Pay fees in full according to the club/provincial alpine association deadlines.

For FIS-level members:  
Step one: Sign athlete declaration. FIS athlete declaration form 
Step two: Ensure your profile is accurate on the FIS website

Proof of insurance requests:

A facility, training or hosting venue may request a proof of insurance certificate listing your clubs name along with the proprietor’s name. To obtain a proof of insurance certificate a request form must be completed. Each certificate request is at a cost of $30. At the time of the request submission, a credit card authorization form will be provided to the individual requesting the certificate. Certificates will not be released until payment has been provided. Please allow for two weeks to process the certificate request.

REMINDER (October, 2014). The certificates of insurance should only be requested and issued where the 3rd party is seeking proof that the club or event is insured and/or wants to be added to the policy as an additional insured. All clubs, club members of the NSO and activities that are calendared are covered – Unless the activity is unusual or not normal to the sport.

It is encouraged that a single certificate of insurance cover all the 3rd party entities for a club, region or zone to avoid separate certificates of insurance where ever possible. It is essential that the correct legal name and address for the entity who wants to be added is provided.

Certificate of insurance request form

Important note: All FIS-calendared races have certificates of insurance created by Alpine Canada and will be distributed to the race organizing committee via the provincial alpine association prior to your event. Please do not submit a request form for a FIS-calendared race and incur an unnecessary fee. Contact your provincial alpine association or Alpine Canada to obtain a copy.

Other helpful insurance tools:
Ski club risk management manual  
Coaches’ training site hazard assessment guide  

Please contact your provincial alpine association for further information.

Single penalty for injured athletes:

If you are injured and will be away from competition for an extended period of time, talk to your coach about having a single penalty applied to your FIS profile to protect your points while you heal.

You can review the single penalty rules in the alpine and ski cross FIS Points rule book.  

Steps to file for injured status:

Step one: Fill out and sign the FIS single penalty form.

FIS single penalty form (alpine)

FIS single penalty form (ski cross)

Step two: Obtain a signed doctor’s note explaining the type of injury and expected time away from competition.

Step three: Submit both documents to your provincial alpine association.

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Media Contact

Media Contact

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Careers

Careers

Alpine Canada employs coaches, ski techs, medical personnel and office staff both on a seasonal and full-time basis. Our main headquarters are located in Calgary, Alberta; however, many of Alpine Canada’s staff travel around the globe with our world-class ski teams.

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Staff & Board

Staff & Board

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Partners

Partners

Alpine Canada’s partners believe in supporting our athletes and teams, and we are faster on the world stage because of them. From corporate partners and suppliers, to resort and funding partners, each play a vital role in helping Alpine Canada achieve funding requirements. These funds allow our athletes to receive world-class coaching, training, support staff and services required to compete on the Olympic and Paralympic world stage.   

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Alumni

Alumni

For more than 50 years, Alpine Canada athletes have been demonstrating teamwork, pride, perseverance and passion through their commitment to the sport of ski racing. Here are some of the dedicated and talented individuals who have represented their country as members of the Canadian Ski Teams.

Olympic Medallists *
Paralympic Medallists
World Championship Medallists

Photo Caption 1956 Olympic Ski Team Source: Ginette Séguin

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History

History

Alpine Canada is the national governing body for alpine, para-alpine and ski cross racing in Canada. With the support of valued corporate partners along with the Government of Canada, Own the Podium and the Canadian Olympic Committee, Alpine Canada develops Olympic, Paralympic, world championship and World Cup medallists to stimulate visibility, inspiration and growth in the ski community. 

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Alpine Canada is home to three of Canada’s fastest and most exciting snow sports: alpine, ski cross and para-alpine ski racing. Each sport has a different set of rules, but each athlete has the same goal: get to the bottom of the mountain faster than anyone else.

Over the last half-century, Alpine Canada’s athletes have done just that winning countless world championship medals, Olympic medals, Paralympic medals, X Games medals, and World Cup podiums.

Here’s a look back at some of Alpine Canada’s proudest moments. Please note, complete lists of all medal winners are located at the bottom of this page.


Canadian ski racing officially began on December 20th, 1920, when the Canadian Amateur Ski Association (CASA) was incorporated under the Dominion Charter. The Association consisted of alpine, cross country, and ski jumping as equal partners. While the Association has morphed over time, the excitement and passion for the sport remains the same.  

Even though 1920 kicked off the official start of ski racing in Canada the sport was enjoyed long before. In 1904, the Montreal Ski Club, a forerunner for all Canadian ski clubs, was established using the slopes of Mont Royal. In 1905 the club moved north to the Manitou Ski Club in Sainte-Agathe. The train brought avid skiers from Montreal and surrounding areas, establishing the Laurentians as a ski destination that is still sought after today.  

When they were incorporated, the Canadian Amateur Ski Association was an honorary member of the Ski Club of Great Britain and was affiliated with the Amateur Athletic Union of Canada, the United States Eastern Amateur Ski Association, and the Fédération Internationale de Ski (FIS) who we remain affiliated with to this day. 

The 1930’s saw the introduction of mechanical lifts (rope-tows) as well as FIS sanctioned events; FIS Alpine World Championships in 1931 and the first Winter Olympics to include alpine ski races in 1936.  

Alpine Canada’s history of champions started in 1956 when Montreal’s Lucile Wheeler won Canada’s first Olympic alpine medal – a bronze in downhill in Cortina d’Ampezzo, ITA. Two years later, she went on to win double gold at the world championships, starting a Canadian tradition of skiing excellence that would eventually rival any country in the world.

In 1960, Anne Heggtveit became the first Canadian to win an Olympic gold medal in slalom at the Winter Games in Squaw Valley, USA. In 1967, Canada’s Nancy Greene won the World Cup overall title in the very first alpine World Cup season. She went on to win the title again in 1968, the same year she won gold and silver at the Grenoble Olympic Games in giant slalom and slalom. In 1999, Greene was named Canada’s Female Athlete of the Century by the Canadian Press.

Keith Nesbitt, general manager of the Canadian Amateur Ski Association estimated in a December 1969 Maclean’s interview that the contribution skiers make to local economies across Canada was incalculable. The same article declared that “Skiing as a national obsession is somewhat ahead of golf and bowling, which was once Canada’s biggest participatory sport.” 

The Canadian Amateur Ski Association changed its name to the Canadian Ski Association (CSA) as the sport continued to grow and divisions (provinces) increased engagement from provincial bodies.  

The 1970's started with 16-year-old Betsy Clifford winning the world giant slalom championships and six years later, Kathy Kreiner won Olympic Gold in giant slalom. Also in the '70s, Canada’s Crazy Canucks - including Ken Read, Steve Podborski, Dave Irwin and Dave Murray - conquered race courses with their bold and daring racing style and proved to the world that you didn’t need to be European to win ski races. In 1975, Read became the first non-European man to win a World Cup downhill race. Together, the Crazy Canucks earned 107 top-10 World Cup results from 1978–1984. Podborski still holds the men’s Canadian record of 20 World Cup podiums.

Also during the ‘70s, the Paralympic movement (which had started after wounded World War II veterans returned home) was gaining momentum around the world, and in 1976, the first Paralympic Games were held in Örnsköldsvik, SWE. John Gow won Canada’s first Paralympic alpine gold in slalom.

In the early '80s, Podborski made history when he became the first North American to win an Olympic medal in men's alpine after claiming bronze in downhill at Lake Placid, U.S.A in 1980. Two years later, he became the first North American to win the overall World Cup title in downhill.

At the 1984 Paralympic Games in Innsbruck, AUT, the para-alpine team set a new Canadian record for a single Games, winning 14 alpine medals.

The ‘80s were also a time when Canada's women's alpine skiing team shone, with Gerry Sorensen winning the 1982 world downhill championships and Laurie Graham, Karen Percy and Gerry Sorensen capturing five Olympic and world championship medals combined between 1982 and 1989.

The highlight for the women’s team came in 1988 when Karen Percy, from Banff, Alta., became a hometown hero by winning the first Canadian medal of the Calgary Olympic Games. The 21-year-old won downhill bronze on the seventh day of competition and went on to win another bronze in super-G a few days later.

The ‘90s were a ground-breaking decade for Canada’s downhill skiers.

1993 saw the creation of Alpine Canada and Cross Country Canada as member organizations of the Canadian Ski Association, which took on the name Canadian Snowsports Association in 2001.  To this day, Alpine Canada remains a proud member of the CSA, alongside other winter sport organizations. Collectively each organization operates through provincial associations and regional divisions consisting of more than 700 clubs with over 97,000 members. 

In 1992, Kerrin Lee-Gartner became the first Canadian to win gold in Olympic downhill at the Games in Albertville, FRA. Kate Pace continued Canada’s downhill domination the following year by winning the world championship title in Morioka, Japan. Then in 1994, Edi Podivinsky grabbed Olympic bronze in downhill in Lillehammer, Norway, a highlight of his 13-year career with Canada’s Alpine Ski Team. Also in 1994, 17-year-old Mélanie Turgeon made her debut, winning five medals, two of them gold in the World Junior Championships. She would go on to win the world downhill championships nine years later (in 2003).

By the end of the decade, a new ski sport was emerging. In 1999, skier X (or ski cross) debuted at the Winter X Games in Aspen, U.S.A, featuring six skiers racing head to head down an extreme course of jumps and banked turns. After the event, the popularity of ski cross spread across North America and Europe and was adopted by the International Ski Federation in 2002 as one of its official ski sports.

The Canadian men’s alpine team began a new era of excellence with Thomas Grandi, a technical specialist, who recorded nine World Cup podiums and inspired the next generation of alpine ski racers. That generation of skiers became known as the Canadian Cowboys.

The Canadian Cowboys –  Benjamin Thomsen, Erik Guay, Francois Bourque, Manny Osborne Paradis, John Kucera, Dustin Cook, Mike Janyk and Jan Hudec – were a force on the World Cup tour.  In 2009, Kucera became the first Canadian male to win a world championship gold medal in downhill with a famous victory in Val d'Isere, France. The Cowboys made Canada’s men’s team a threat on the world stage once again. In 2009, Kucera became the first Canadian male to win a world championship gold medal in downhill with a famous victory in Val d'Isere, FRA. The Cowboys made Canada’s men’s team a threat on the world stage once again.

While alpine athletes were racking up podiums, Canada was gathering a team of skiers to challenge the ski cross podium at the sport’s first Olympic Games in Vancouver. In 2007, Canada unveiled its first official national ski cross team.

Canada’s para-alpine ski team was making history as well. In 2007, Karolina Wisniewska, eight-time Paralympic medallist, became the first Paralympian to be inducted into the Canadian Ski Hall of Fame.

Canada has dominated the ski cross world from the beginning, with a men’s podium-sweep at the 2010 X Games, and following that with Ashleigh McIvor’s win of the first women’s Olympic ski cross gold medal.

B.C.’s Lauren Woolstencroft won five gold medals at the 2010 Paralympic Games, becoming the first woman ever to do so in a single Games. She retired after that with a career total of 10 Paralympic medals.

The following year, 2011, was also a memorable year for Canadian ski racing, as Chris Del Bosco and Kelsey Serwa won double gold at the ski cross World Championships in Deer Valley, U.S.A, and alpine racer Erik Guay won the downhill at the World Championships in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany.

That same year, Chris Williamson of Markham, Ont. made para-alpine history in Arta Terme, Italy, when he stepped onto the IPC (International Paralympic Committee) World Cup podium for the 100th time in his career.

From 2012 to 2020, Alpine Canada athletes have won Crystal Globes, Olympic medals, and several World Cup races. 

The era started with a bang in 2012 when Guay, Jan Hudec, and Ben Thomsen finished 1-3-5 respectively in the World Cup downhill in Chamonix, France. That was the best result on the men’s side since Ed Podvinsky and Cary Mullen came 1-2 in 1994. On the women’s side, Erin Mielzynski captured a gold medal in slalom in Ofterschwang, Germany, becoming the first Canadian to win a World Cup slalom in over 40 years.

Canadians have also enjoyed tremendous success in ski cross since 2012, with Marielle Thompson winning the Crystal Globe three times,and Kevin Drury capturing the first by a Canadian male in 2020. Over two Olympic games, the group has also won five Olympic medals, with Thompson, Brady Leman, and Kelsey Serwa striking gold, with impressive 1-2 results on the women’s side in both 2014 (Serwa) and 2018 (Phelan).  As a team, Canada has won four Nation’s Cup titles since 2012 and a grand total of 8. 

In Para-Alpine, nine Canadians, including Josh Dueck, Caleb Brousseau, Kimberly Joines, Kurt Oatway, Alex Guimond, Alana Ramsay, Chris Williamson, Mac Marcoux, and Mollie Jepsen have been on the Paralympic podium through two Games. Jepsen made headlines at Pyeongchang 2018, bursting onto the international stage with four medals, including a gold. Mac Marcoux and his guides have also been the epitome of success, winning five Crystal Globes since 2014. In 2020, after retiring, Josh Dueck (who won two medals in the 2014 Games) was named Canada’s chef de mission for the 2022 Paralympics in Beijing, China. 

While the Canadian Cowboys were starting their ride into the sunset, Erik Guay landed on the podium twice at 2017 World Championships in St. Mortiz, Switzerland ,winning the super g and earning a silver in the downhill.  Erik and teammate Manuel Osborne-Paradis, who captured bronze in the super g on his 33rd birthday, made history the only Canadian men to have stood on the podium together in an alpine skiing world championship. 

Since 2012, there has been a passing of the torch on all of the teams, as veterans began making way for young athletes on the World Cup stage. Many of Canada’s up and coming athletes witnessed Canada’s past success and have been inspired by their heroes, who are now guiding them to future glory. 


File Description Download
Paralympic Medallists pdf (159 KB)
FIS World Championship Medallists pdf (143 KB)
Olympic Medallists pdf (61 KB)